codeshow()

Posted: August 19, 2014 in Windows
Tags: , ,

Project Description

This is a Windows 8 HTML/JS project with the express goal of demonstrating simple development concepts for the Windows 8 platform. You may learn some stuff about end-to-end app architecture by looking at the source code of codeShow, but the primary goal of the project is to help you learn discrete programming tasks such as accessing the camera, implementing an asymmetric ListView, or handling errors look to codeShow.
To see what’s new with codeShow, visit the news page.

 

More…

http://codeshow.codeplex.com/

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Code:
    ///In filters register:
    // This method allows the client to override their browser's HTTP Accept header by putting a value in the querystring.
    //...
    GlobalConfiguration.Configuration.Filters.Add(new FormattingOverrideFilterAttribute(formatPreferenceOverride: "application/json", clearOtherPreferredMediaTypes: true));
    //...
///...

public class FormattingOverrideFilterAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute{
    /// <summary>
    /// Allows overriding the Accept header by querystring or server preference.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="formatPreferenceOverride">If defined, this mime type will be injected into the Accept header of every request.</param>
    /// <param name="newQuality">Optional, The quality setting for this media type. Should be between 1 and 0.</param>
    /// <param name="clearOtherPreferredMediaTypes">If true, will remove all other media types from the Accept header.</param>
    public FormattingOverrideFilterAttribute(string formatPreferenceOverride = null, double? newQuality = null, bool clearOtherPreferredMediaTypes = false) : base() {
        NewQualityValue = newQuality;
        FormatPreferenceOverride = formatPreferenceOverride;
        ClearOtherPreferredMediaTypes = clearOtherPreferredMediaTypes;
    }

    public double? NewQualityValue { get; set; }
    public string FormatPreferenceOverride { get; set; }
    public bool ClearOtherPreferredMediaTypes { get; set; }

    public override void OnActionExecuting(System.Web.Http.Controllers.HttpActionContext actionContext) {
        var qs = actionContext.Request.RequestUri.ParseQueryString();

        var requestedMediaType = (qs["f"] ?? qs["format"] ?? FormatPreferenceOverride ?? String.Empty).ToLower();

        switch (requestedMediaType) {
            case "xml":
            case "x":
                requestedMediaType = "application/xml";
                break;
            case "j":
            case "js":
            case "json":
                requestedMediaType = "application/json";
                break;
        }

        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(requestedMediaType))
            return; // No action is necessary because no override was requested.

        var acceptHeaders = actionContext.Request.Headers.Accept;
        MediaTypeWithQualityHeaderValue header = null;

        if (ClearOtherPreferredMediaTypes) {
            var newAcceptHeaders = acceptHeaders.Where(h => h.MediaType == requestedMediaType || h.MediaType == "*/*").ToList();
            acceptHeaders.Clear();
            newAcceptHeaders.ForEach(acceptHeaders.Add);
        }

        header = acceptHeaders.FirstOrDefault(h => h.MediaType == requestedMediaType);
        if (header == null) {
            header = new System.Net.Http.Headers.MediaTypeWithQualityHeaderValue(requestedMediaType);
            acceptHeaders.Add(header);
        }

        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Overidding HttpAccept header for format preference.");
        header.Quality = NewQualityValue;
    }
}

Sources:

Best—> http://weblog.west-wind.com/posts/2012/Apr/02/Creating-a-JSONP-Formatter-for-ASPNET-Web-API

Another…. ->http://weblog.west-wind.com/posts/2012/Mar/09/Removing-the-XML-Formatter-from-ASPNET-Web-API-Applications

Join me and Christopher Harrison (@geektrainer) for a free, full day online training event on Developing ASP.NET MVC4 Web Applications! There’s still space available, so register now.

MVA - ASP.NET MVC 4 Jump Start

Microsoft Virtual Academy (MVA) runs great, high quality live training events. Earlier this year, I had the opportunity to participate in the Building Web Apps with ASP.NET Jump Start with Scott Hanselman and Damian Edwards. For that event, we overviewed the Microsoft web platform, including a lot of new and preview features.

For this upcoming event, we’re going to be sticking closer to the curriculum for the Developing ASP.NET MVC 4 Web Applications certification exam (70-486) curriculum. Christopher is a full time, professional instructor (MCT, MCPD, MCITP) who’s helped people prepare for this exam, and we’re going to be basing the Jump Start content on what you’d learn in a 70-486 certification course.

Here’s an overview of what we’re planning to cover:

  • Overview of MVC
    • What is MVC?
    • How is MVC different from Web Forms?
    • Why use MVC?
  • Developing ASP.NET MVC 4 Controllers and Models
    • Creating Controllers
    • Adding Actions
    • Creating MVC Models
    • Working with Code First
  • Developing ASP.NET MVC 4 Views
    • Razor Syntax
    • HTML Helpers
    • Partial Views
  • Integrating JavaScript and MVC
    • Using AJAX
    • Using jQuery
  • Implementing Web APIs
    • Developing Web API Controllers
    • Calling HTTP Services from Client-Side Code
  • Deploying ASP.NET MVC Site Walkthrough
    • Creating a site on Windows Azure Web Sites
    • Deploying an ASP.NET MVC Application with Visual Studio Web Deploy
  • What’s Next and Resources
    • Sneak peak at Visual Studio 2013 (Preview) and ASP.NET MVC 5 tooling
    • A look at real-time communications with SignalR
    • Resources for keeping up with new ASP.NET releases

Note that this is a Jump Start to help you get started preparing for the certification exam, but with a one day event we’re only covering a portion of the content that’s on the exam. Don’t expect to watch this and breeze through the exam… but it’s a start.

And if you’re just new to ASP.NET MVC and want a full day (free!) day of training, this is a great opportunity. We’re working off some of the certification content, but you don’t need to be working towards the certification to take or benefit from the class.

To get you warmed up for it, here’s the one hour introduction to ASP.NET MVC 4 from the Building Web Apps with ASP.NET Jump Start this past February.

This tutorial shows how to support CRUD operations in an HTTP service using ASP.NET Web API.

CRUD stands for “Create, Read, Update, and Delete,” which are the four basic database operations. Many HTTP services also model CRUD operations through REST or REST-like APIs.

In this tutorial, you will build a very simple web API to manage a list of products. Each product will contain a name, price, and category (such as “toys” or “hardware”), plus a product ID.

Download the completed project.

The products API will expose following methods.

Action HTTP method Relative URI
Get a list of all products GET /api/products
Get a product by ID GET /api/products/id
Get a product by category GET /api/products?category=category
Create a new product POST /api/products
Update a product PUT /api/products/id
Delete a product DELETE /api/products/id

Notice that some of the URIs include the product ID in path. For example, to get the product whose ID is 28, the client sends a GET request for http://hostname/api/products/28.

Resources

The products API defines URIs for two resource types:

Resource URI
The list of all the products. /api/products
An individual product. /api/products/id

Methods

The four main HTTP methods (GET, PUT, POST, and DELETE) can be mapped to CRUD operations as follows:

  • GET retrieves the representation of the resource at a specified URI. GET should have no side effects on the server.
  • PUT updates a resource at a specified URI. PUT can also be used to create a new resource at a specified URI, if the server allows clients to specify new URIs. For this tutorial, the API will not support creation through PUT.
  • POST creates a new resource. The server assigns the URI for the new object and returns this URI as part of the response message.
  • DELETE deletes a resource at a specified URI.

Note: The PUT method replaces the entire product entity. That is, the client is expected to send a complete representation of the updated product. If you want to support partial updates, the PATCH method is preferred. This tutorial does not implement PATCH.

Create a New Web API Project

Start by running Visual Studio and select New Project from the Start page. Or, from the File menu, select Newand then Project.

In the Templates pane, select Installed Templates and expand the Visual C# node. Under Visual C#, select Web. In the list of project templates, select ASP.NET MVC 4 Web Application. Name the project “ProductStore” and click OK.

In the New ASP.NET MVC 4 Project dialog, select Web API and click OK.

Adding a Model

model is an object that represents the data in your application. In ASP.NET Web API, you can use strongly typed CLR objects as models, and they will automatically be serialized to XML or JSON for the client. (more…)